Monday, October 20, 2014

15 Tips for Talking to Kids about Ebola

By David Fassler, M.D.
Child and adolescent psychiatrist 
Parents and teachers may find themselves faced with the challenge of discussing the evolving Ebola epidemic with children. Although these may be difficult conversations, they are also important. There are no “right” or “wrong” ways to talk with kids about Ebola, but here are some suggestions if you need help. 
1. Provide an open and supportive environment where children know they can ask questions. At the same time, it’s best not to force children to talk about Ebola unless and until they’re ready.
2. Answer questions honestly. Kids will usually know, or eventually find out, if you’re “making things up." It may affect their trust in you or your reassurances in the future.
3. Use words and ideas children can understand. Gear your explanations to the child’s age, language, and developmental level.
4. Help kids find accurate and up to date information. Print out Fact Sheets from the CDC, CNN, WHO and
5. Be ready to repeat information and explanations several times. Some information may be hard to accept or understand. Asking the same question over and over may also be a way for a child to ask for reassurance.
6. Acknowledge and validate the child’s thoughts, feelings, and reactions. Let them know that you think their questions and concerns are important and appropriate.
7. Remember that kids often personalize situations. For example, they may worry about their own safety and the safety of family members. They may also worry about friends or relatives who travel or live far away.
8. Be comforting, but don’t make unrealistic promises. It’s fine to let children know that they are safe in their home or at school. But you can’t promise that there will be no cases of Ebola in your state or community.
9. Let kids know that there are lots of people helping the families affected by Ebola. This time is a good opportunity to show children that when something scary or bad happens, there are people to help.
10. Children learn from watching their parents and teachers. They will be very interested in how you react to news about Ebola. They also learn from listening to your conversations with other adults.
11. Don’t let kids watch too much television with frightening images. The repetition of such scenes can be disturbing and confusing.
12. Children who have experienced serious illness, loss, or other traumatic events in the past are particularly vulnerable to graphic news reports or images of death. These children may need extra support and attention.
13. Watch for physical symptoms including headaches and stomachaches. Often times, kids express anxiety through physical aches and pains. An increase in such symptoms without apparent medical cause may be a sign that a child is feeling anxious or overwhelmed.
14. Children who are consumed with questions or worry about Ebola should be evaluated by a trained and qualified mental health professional. Other signs that a child may need additional care include: ongoing sleep problems, frequent fears about illness or death, or reluctance to leave parents or go to school. If such behaviors continue, ask your child’s pediatrician, family physician, or school counselor to help you contact a mental health professional. 
15. Although parents and teachers may follow the news and the daily updates with interest and attention, most kids just want to be kids. They may not want to think about what’s happening across the country or elsewhere in the world. They’d rather play ball, climb trees, or ride bikes.
Public health emergencies are not easy for anyone to comprehend or accept. Understandably, many young children feel frightened and confused.  As parents, teachers, and caring adults, we can best help by listening and responding honestly and comfortingly. Fortunately, most children, even those who have experienced loss or illness, are quite resilient.  However, by creating an open environment where they feel free to ask questions, we can help them cope with stressful events and experiences.

David Fassler, M.D., is a child and adolescent psychiatrist practicing in Burlington, Vermont. He is also a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Adult Bullying in the Workplace

By Brad Zehring, DO
I would rather be a little nobody, then to be an evil somebody - Abraham Lincoln

Typically, when bullying is talked about it is in the context of children or adolescents during some level of schooling. Rarely do we think about bullying as an adult issue. However, much more attention has been focused on adult bullying – more specifically, adult bullying in the workplace.

According to various sources, citing research and survey’s, it has been reported that as many as 1 in 4 adults will face some form of bullying in their career.  It is important to point out the differences between constructive criticism, workplace conflict, and bullying. Workplace bullying focuses on the person rather than the performance or task being completed by the person. In addition, the person being targeted feels powerless to stop it. Making the situation worse, is when the adult being bullied goes to management to report the offense and the abuse is minimized or discounted altogether. Complicating the issue further is the difficulty verbalizing what is taking place or being unaware that what is occurring is bullying, leading to worsening suffering.

What are some forms of workplace bullying?
As discussed earlier, workplace bullying can be described as an extreme pattern where the person is isolated apart from his/her performance or task. Some examples of workplace bullying are: being left-out of work-related social events, coworkers refusing to help when asked, coworkers leaving the room when you enter or routinely arriving to meetings late that when you call them, being yelled at, put down, or disciplined in front of your coworkers. These are some of the ways that workplace bullying presents, but it is not an exhaustive list.

How workplace bullying is harmful
For individuals who are being bullied in the workplace, their desire to go into work day after day is diminished and their satisfaction in their performance and with their employer decreases.  Many reports discuss the loss of productivity when job satisfaction decreases. Beyond the psychological stress (depression, anxiety, PTSD, etc) – which should not be minimized, stress from bullying can lead to physical illness such as stroke, heart attacks, chronic fatigue or dissatisfaction in an person’s personal life – including leading to suicide. There are many reports documenting poor job satisfaction negatively affecting all areas on one’s life. Feeling accomplished and satisfied in a career can lead to a happier personal life and vice versa.

How to prevent or deal with workplace bullying
While recognizing or speaking up about workplace bullying can be a difficult task - it is important not to be silent about bullying experiences, whether personal attacks or witnessed attacks on colleagues, or isolate from those that may be able to help. Currently, states are working on anti-bullying bills to encourage healthy workplace environments, but fostering a workplace for your coworkers that doesn’t tolerate bullying is key. Many organizations provide or contract with mental health professionals willing to discuss, advise, and help an individual navigate the process. It is important to document your concerns and be specific and concise with the message you are trying to convey if you feel you are being bullied. Despite how difficult it may be, it is important to approach the bully or go to your supervisor with a calm demeanor and discuss your concerns rationally. Lastly, it is important to have an open mind about the situation. Sometimes it may be that the “bully” does not realize how his/her actions have affected you. Approaching them, or the situation, calmly will provide an environment for understanding and increase the probability for change.